Humble Pie Co’s Humble Burger, Section 17, PJ, Malaysia

This is one of those slightly odd non-reviews that comes about when I’m travelling and poorly equipped to give a critical analysis of the burgers in question. In this case, the Humble Pie Co‘s Humble burger, eaten as a takeaway meal whilst on holiday in Malaysia visiting my folks.

I’ll freely admit, the HPC wasn’t my target takeaway – the neighbouring “Grind Burger Bar” was my intended goal, described by a cousin as “The Best Burger in the Klang Valley.” We were looking forward to it, but when I got there… the chef had taken an unscheduled hour off to do… something… just before peak dinner service. So, having braced a tropical storm to get there, I stormed off…

…and was relieved to find that the Humble Pie Co next door did, indeed, have a burger on the menu, and what’s more, its humble burger sounded intriguing.

Here’s how it bills itself: “House marinated ground topside minced beef, purple cabbage coleslaw, roasted onion, tomato, mild cheddar on house-made light brioche buns, potato wedges and garlic mayo.” As a bonus, it’s served with a Belacan sauce. For the uninitiated, belacan is a spicy shrimp paste made, extremely pungent and with a serious chilli kick when done well. Read more here.

Weighing in at RM 18 ++ (about £3.50) this is pretty bargainous for a gourmet-style burger, though probably pricey in the land of Ramly Burgers (cheap, unspecified meat-burgers wrapped in egg – see pic below!).

30748064_Unknown

Anyway, back to the Humbleburger.

It was good meat, no question, in a very fine bun – a not-particularly-sweet brioche. The burger was slightly overdone for my liking (no pink to it at all), but it was coarse ground, well-seasoned and juicy. The salad was crisp and a strong supporting cast member (red cabbage… inspired)… but the belacan… well, I wasn’t too impressed. It wasn’t spicy enough to be interesting, salty enough to provide umami in place of more conventional cheese and bacon, and not belacan-y enough to make it feel like a worthwhile local flavour. The net result is a whole that is somehow slightly less than the some of its parts.

The supporting sides; thick cut chips, basically, with mayo (not wedges) – lost something in takeaway translation, but were well cooked and tasty nonetheless.

On balance, it was a good effort. Here’s to exploring Malaysia’s burger bar scene a little more the next time I visit my family there.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s